BUYING THE BEST JUICER FOR YOU!


What kinds of juicers are there?

The Masticating machine operates at a slower speed. It chews the fibres and breaks up the cells of vegetables and fruits. The Champion juicer is an example of the type.
This Masticator is excellent for leafy greens such as spinach and wheatgrass, but is less successful at juicing fruits and soft-celled vegetables. Apple juice, for example, will end up more like an apple purée.
The Centrifugal machine first shreds the fruit and vegetables then pushes them through a spinning strainer. This method usually yields a far greater volume of juice. The Acme, Omega 1220 and 4220, L’Equipe and NutriCentre are centrifugal machines.
The Centrifugal machines are easy to operate and clean, and, in the case of the better quality machines, deliver a very good quality juice. Thus most juicers sold on the market are centrifugal.
The Triturating machine has a two-step process. The first step crushes the fruits and vegetables, while the second step wrings or presses the juice.

The Triturating machine has a two-step process. The first step crushes the fruits and vegetables, while the second step wrings or presses the juice. The Oscar-Matstone and Greenpower are triturating juices. These machines do more than just juice; they will homogenize, make pasta and nut butters (although this is not “peanut butter” as you know it). An added bonus is that the triturator is a terrific wheatgrass and leafy greens juicer.

How much will my juicer cost?
The juicers we have mentioned in this article are high quality juicers from manufacturers that, in some cases, have been making juicers for over forty years. Prices vary widely. The manufacturers suggested retail starts at R1990.00 for the NutriCentre, up to R23, 990.00 for the Norwalk Hydraulic Press, the average ranging from R1990.00 to R3990.00.


Though one can buy a juicer for less than R499.00, these will have small capacity, low horsepower motors and will not be that efficient for someone who wants to do regular juicing.